Menu
Home Page

Pupil Premium

Show Respect Work Together Aspire Nurture

What is Pupil Premium?

 

The Pupil Premium is currently £1320 per pupil. It is allocated to schools based on the number of children who claim free school meals, or who have claimed free school meals in the last 6 years. Children in Local Authority care also receive additional funding called LAC funding, which is £1900 per pupil and service families (with a parent in the armed forces) also are allocated a pupil premium of £300 per pupil. Early Years and Foundation Stage Pupil Premium is approximately £100 per term on a 15 hours entitlement basis.

Please read the information below which gives details of our Pupil Premium Grant and how we allocate the funding.

 

 

Pupil Premium Summary Report 2016-2017

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 to provide additional funding specifically for disadvantaged pupils. The amount provided has grown over the years to total £1320 per primary pupil in the current financial year. This is funding provided to schools which is additional to main school funding. It is allocated according to the number of pupils on roll who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) within the past 6 years, a smaller amount allocated according to the number of children of service families, and an allocation for each pupil who has been ‘Looked After’ (in care).

It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility. However, schools are to be held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low-income families. Please see below for information regarding how the pupil premium was spent in the last academic year, the impact of this funding, and the plans for future spending.

Assessment data has been tracked using a new data system on o-track, which was introduced in the Spring Term 2017, with Autumn tracking data being converted into this new system from Autumn End Assessments.

How much funding do we receive?

Here at Lovers’ Lane Primary we are committed to narrowing gaps and ensuring that every pupil excels. The pupil premium funding additional funding for schools in England is aimed at raising the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and closing the gap between them and their peers.

In September 2016, 68 of our 187 pupils in Years 1-6 were classified as Pupil Premium. This is 37% of our children (compared to the National Average of 26.2% in 2015-16). This year each child receives £1320, making a total of £89,760, with 2 children qualifying after this, which has given us 70 pupil premium children in total, although their funding will come into 2017-18 budget. These children have still had provision during the year to ensure we close the gap with their peers as needed.

Pupil Premium Funding 2016/17 academic year (based on a financial year)

Pupils eligible for free school meals (last 6 years)

68 pupils @ £1320

£89,760

Pupils from service families

1 pupils @ £300

£300

Pupils in Local Authority care (LAC)

2 pupils @ £1900

£3800

Total Pupil Premium

 

£93,860

 

Cohort of Pupils at Lovers’ Lane Primary and Nursery in 2016-17

Number of Pupils

Number of Non Pupil Premium Pupils

Number of Pupil Premium Pupils

% Pupil Premium

F2

29

21

8

28%

Year 1

28

22

6

21%

Year 2

30

17

13

43%

Year 3

27

16

11

42%

Year 4

30

19

11

37%

Year 5

21

12

9

43%

Year 6

24

18

6

24%

How will we measure the effectiveness of the Pupil Premium funding?

We track the progress and attainment of our pupils half termly and we compare our Pupil Premium pupils to our Non-Pupil Premium pupils. Analysis of pupils’ progress is essential. We identify any barriers to learning and devise strategies to overcome these and meet the needs of all learners who are at risk of not achieving their potential.

If you have any queries or would like to know more about Pupil Premium funding and how it is used, please contact the school office.

What have we used our funding for this year?

We categorise our interventions into 3 areas:

Learning interventions – where we support children to close gaps in their learning.

Behaviour and Emotional Wellbeing interventions – where we support children with emotional or behavioural issues they are facing.

Wider opportunities – where we provide wider opportunities for children as part of the curriculum or after school.

What was the impact for our children?

Type of intervention

Summary of intervention

Specific Intended Outcomes

Approach adopted

Education Endowment Fund 2016 (Average Rating Impact)

«««««

(evidence)

Estimated cost of intervention

Actual Impact during

2016-17

Learning Interventions

Switch on

(ACr TA)

 

Improved reading comprehension skills, increased reading outcomes

Feedback

One to one

+8

+5

«««

««««

£7085.10 (this year)

To follow

ELKLAN

(Paula Nicholson- TA)

 

Increased communication and language, confidence

Small group tuition

One to one

+4

 

+5

««

 

««««

£450

To follow

Staff CPD

English Lead

Training in approaches to developing Spelling and Writing

 

 

Small group tuition

+4

««

 

£300

Training in No-nonsense spelling and Slow Writing have been used to boost pupils who are not on track for ARE or pupils moving to GD.

Impact shows that these interventions have …

Vulnerable reads (TA hours)

 

 

Reading comprehension strategies

Feedback

One to one

 

Phonics

 

+5

 

 

+8

+5

 

+5

««««

 

 

«««

 

««««

 

«««««

 

£25,171.20

Of 25 pupils:

6 made progress (1 step)

4 made good (2 steps) progress

4 made significant (3 steps) progress

1 pupil regressed in the last term (safeguarding)

2 pupils made small steps of progress

5 pupils on SEND register made small steps (eg pscales)

2 pupils new to English

SEN Interventions (Non Reading)

 

 

 

 

 

£2323.15

SEN children have increased in confidence. Small steps progress seen in p-scales tracking.

Maths Interventions (TA hours)

 

 

Small group tuition

+4

«««

 

£1573.20

 

See data analysis below

 

 

 

 

 

In class support 1 hour TA salary per TA per morning

 

 

 

 

 

Feedback

Small grp tuition

Oral language intervention

 

+8

+4

 

+5

 

«««

««

 

 

««««

 

£18893.60

See data analysis below

 

 

Behavioural and Emotional Well-being interventions

 

 

Breakfast staff

 

 

Extending school time

+2

«««

 

£2361.70

Children come ready to learn

It help me make friends in different classes’

‘ I get to do different activities and help my mum because she works and because I get breakfast I think harder in class’

‘ It helps me get ready for the day, because I am more awake and more energised’

Pupil Mentoring (Learning Mentor Kate Lambert)

 

 

Behaviour interventions

Mentoring

Social and emotional learning

Metacognition and self regulation

+3

 

+1

+4

 

+8

 

«««««

 

 

 

««««

 

 

 

««««

 

 

£7085.10

Most children have been ready to learn and developed skills to cope better with the social and emotional distresses they have experienced.

Pupils show more self-confidence and improved resilience and appropriate strategies for coping.

Think Children

£ 1,600

 

Social and emotional

+4

««««

 

Most children have been ready to learn and developed skills to cope better with the social and emotional distresses they have experienced

Casy Counselling

£2850

 

Social and emotional

+4

««««

 

Pupils have been more focused, calm and able to concentrate and behave with positive learner attitude in class.

Impact reports from Casy on 1:1 counselling show entry and exit data, which indicates improved confidence and management of emotions.

 

 

Wider Enrichment Opportnities

After School Clubs and lunchtime clubs (staffing)

 

 

Social and emotional

+4

««««

£4723.40

A range of after school clubs are provided including: ICT, art and crafts, gardening and film club. These enhance skills specific to the club as well as improving co-operation and social skills.

Lunchtime clubs include: home learning and sketch club. These allow skill and social development during school time as well as homework support.

Educational Visit support

 

 

 

 

 

£1500 (trips)

All pupils had opportunity to access enrichment in the curriculum and support class learning.

Enrichment – Residential Field Visit Y6

 

Social and emotional

+4

««««

£520 (residential Y6)

All pupils had opportunity to access enrichment in the curriculum and support class learning.

Instrumental Music Tuition

 

 

Arts participation

Sports

+2

 

+2

«««

 

««

£500

Pupils have reported enjoying their music lessons and gave performances in assembly. Tuition gives pupils increased self-esteem and music learning also supports maths learning (notation)

                 

 

Case Studies of particular interventions to have shown significant impact during 2016-17

  1. Reading and Writing interventions – Daily reading is the most popular intervention that we do and has high impact on the children’s decoding skills, inference/deduction as well as promoting the enjoyment/necessity of reading. These children are identified as being vulnerable reads due to: no or little home support, EAL or extra support needed due to learning abilities. This intervention is needed in order for the children to be able to access other areas of the curriculum. Half termly progression is shown through the PM Benchmark assessment tool where some children make significant progress and can come off the intervention. Phonics interventions have shown impact to plug gaps and is shown on the phonics trackers, especially in Years 1, 2 and 3

  2. Maths interventions – Power of 1 and Power of 2 is used to identify and plug gaps in basic maths skills and is used predominantly in KS2.

  3. Wider Opportunities – CASY counselling is used to support individual children identified to have emotional, social, mental health or behavioural needs. These children are identified through termly School and Family Support (SaFS) meetings with the SENCO and Safeguarding team and progress is then monitored termly. Our School learning mentor has made an impact when working with individuals identified at SaFS and over time these children are no longer a concern with the SaFS team.

     

Current data on Progress of Pupil Premium Children

Summary

  • Accelerated progress can be seen across all age groups, which is seen in the movement of percentages at each level of attainment.

  • Identified children who are slow movers or progressing in small steps within a grade band (seen in assessment tickets or tracking of p-scales), are either SEN, GRT (and have been travelling – hence no Summer data available) or EAL new to English. Provision is in place for these pupils either with an Individual Provision Map (SEN), Traveller packs for travelling (GRT) or additional support from EAL teacher (EAL).

  • Other children who have needed additional support have additional pastoral care, intervention or may have a Targeted Support Plan for 2017-18 provision to close the gap.

  • Some pupils on the vulnerable register (eg 2 boys in Y4) have made accelerated progress from B to W2 for writing and one EAL pupil has moved from B to W2. The same EAL pupil has moved from B to W3 in Maths and is close to ARE already, having been in the country and in school for just 2 terms.

  • ReadingShift overall (whole school) from Autumn End to Summer end has been from 44% Autumn End to 66.03% ARE+ by Summer End (increase of 22.03%)

  • Writing - Shift overall (whole school) from Autumn End to Summer end has been from 31.48% Autumn End to 55.36% ARE+ by Summer End (increase of 23.88%)

  • Maths - Shift overall (whole school) from Autumn End to Summer end has been from 27.78% Autumn End to 58.93% ARE+ by Summer End (increase of 31.15%)

     

This shows that our PP strategies and Quality First Teaching approaches are making a positive impact and are accelerating progress for pupils in this group.

 

 

What will our Pupil Premium allocation be next year?

Expected Pupil Premium Funding 2017/18 academic year

Pupils eligible for free school meals (last 6 years)

52 pupils @ £1,320

£68,640

Pupils from service families

0 pupils @ £300

 

Pupils in Local Authority care (LAC)

1 pupil @ £1900

£ 1900

Total Pupil Premium

 

£70,540

 

 

What could we use it for?

Additional ideas/Planned use of funding 2017/18 academic year

  • Lunch time clubs
  • After school clubs
  • Sporting events
  • Breakfast club
  • Learning mentor
  • Switch on TA
  • TA interventions
  • Third Space Learning
  • Attendance and Family Liason officer role extended to supporting ‘Reading at Home’ with our families
  • Additional support for identified cohorts – additional teacher time.
  • Casy Counselling
  • E-Voucher for: uniform, PE kit
  • Each year group to have a costing of Pupil Premium monies – tracking system to be developed to monitor and develop this

 

 

 

Please see separate Pupil Premium Strategy Document for our comprehensive spending strategy for the Pupil Premium Allocation in 2017-18.

Pupil premium strategy statement Lover’s Lane Primary and Nursery School

  1. Summary information

School

Lovers’ Lane Primary School

Academic Year

2017-18

Total PP budget

(Year 1 to 6) Excluding EYPP

£79,200

Date of most recent PP Review

October 2017

Total number of pupils

169

Number of pupils eligible for PP

63

Date for next internal review of this strategy

February 2018

 

  1. Current attainment – 2017 National Tests in Y6, cohort of 24 children (From Raiseonline / FFT Aspire)

Assessing Without Levels – Expected or mastered %

Pupils eligible for PP (your school)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

 

% achieving at least the expected standard in reading, writing and maths

63% PP,

68.3%

% making at least the expected standard in reading

56% PP,

71%

% making at least the expected Standard in writing

88% PP,

76%

% making at least the expected standard in maths

75% PP,

75%

Average scaled score PP Non FSM (in last 6 years) (Reading and Maths)

102.2

104.1

Average scaled score PP FSM (in last 6 years) (Reading and Maths)

104.9

104.1

Scaled progress score in writing

1.83

2.8

Scaled progress score in reading

-3.81

0.5

Scaled progress score in maths

-0.82

0.8

Attendance

tbc

96%

Whole school current predictions for all PP children

% on track for expected standard in reading, writing and maths (prediction) whole school

tbc

Data to be confirmed

% on track for expected standard in reading (prediction) whole school

tbc

Data to be confirmed

% on track for expected standard in writing (prediction) whole school

tbc

Data to be confirmed

% on track for expected standard in maths (prediction) whole school

tbc

Data to be confirmed

 

  1. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

  1.  

Oral language skills in Foundation are lower for pupils for Pupil Premium – large cohort of speech therapy support

  1.  

Ensuring progress of SEND (on the register) children is clear with the assessment tickets – closing the gap in learning (small steps).

C.

Some pupils have gaps in learning from previous years (eg due to significant events in their lives, changes to curriculum, very low starting points on entry).

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

D.

Home circumstances (including some pupils with CP, TAC, PEP /LAC, Monitoring for Safeguarding) Learner behaviour – ability to focus and concentrate in school.

E.

Parental engagement – eg attitudes to reading at home (eg many PP children are on vulnerable reads list)

F.

Attendance

  1. Desired outcomes

 

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

 

  1.  

Improve oral language skills for pupils eligible for Pupil Premium in FSU.

Pupils in KS1 needing support gain SALT and ELKLAN intervention. ELKLAN is also disseminated to pupils in KS2. Parents of selected pupils in EYFS attend and complete ELKLAN TALK for under 5s through Bridge Children’s Centre (hosted by school).

 

School Improvement target 1: Closing the gap; School Improvement target 2: Improving Teaching and Learning (Quality First teaching – all good and increased outstanding)

End of year outcomes for CL and Reading show progress and these areas are increased from previous year outcomes. Progress tracked in case studies. Closing the gap data is tracked in all Pupil progress meetings and is linked to Performance Management data targets.

 

  1.  

Clear steps of progress made with SEND (on the register) children to narrow the gap in learning.

 

 

 

School Improvement target 1: Closing the gap; School Improvement target 2: Improving Teaching and Learning (Quality First teaching – all good and increased outstanding)

Use of the new Compass assessment system to monitor progress as well as Benchmarking, Boxhall and Case Studies to profile different Vulnerable groups. Closing the gap data is tracked in all Pupil progress meetings and is linked to Performance Management data targets.

 

  1.  

Use of collaborative strategies in school to engage all learners. Interventions are in place to close the gap. All subject areas where pupils are beginning are addressed by intervention. Pupils have targeted intervention supported by PP funding. Data for vulnerable groups per class term on term show closing of the gap between PP and Non PP pupils. Progress for PP pupils is accelerated.

PP children on interventions are tracked on a spreadsheet which covers all power statements for all years 1-6 for R, W, M to ensure closing the gap is rigorous and tailored to pupil needs.

Need is cross checked with Q by Q analysis of assessment papers at data drops.

 

 

 

 

School Improvement target 1: Closing the gap; School Improvement target 2: Improving Teaching and Learning (Quality First teaching – all good and increased outstanding)

Progression in confidence, engagement and sustained periods of concentration. Pupils produce more work of a higher standard – seen in monitoring. Work Scrutiny

Teachers use power statements from the previous academic year to inform intervention focus and use a checklist of these for R, W, M in intervention folder to check off in formative assessment.

Intervention summaries reflect accelerated progress for target PP children. Closing the gap data is tracked in all Pupil progress meetings and is linked to Performance Management data targets. Intervention trackers are monitored and reviewed half termly by SENCO and Headteacher. Stuck Children Case studies discussed at ATM – minutes and case study annotation.

 

  1.  

All pupils are tracked by mapping of Pathway to Provision for services.

Pupils and families identified are supported through EHAF, TAC, CIN, etc meetings.

Close working with Children’s Centres, School Nurse team, SBAP, Family Service, CAMHS and other settings feeding into or transitioning from our school (to ensure working together around the whole family, including siblings).

Monitoring of Pathway to Provision for services identifies pupils moving between levels and numbers at a level 2, 3, 4 see pupils moving back down the pathway to provision back to Universal entitlement. SAFs Book and Safeguard data summaries.

 

  1.  

Parents’ views are consulted and feedback informs policy and SIP.

Parent drop-ins termly with School, Nurse and Children’s Centre

School to host adult education courses in collaboration with Children’s Centres and local colleges

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Improvement Target 4: Building Resilience and Emotional Health and Well Being, including Parents and Staff.

Percentages for parental engagement are tracked in school at end of each term/ half term:

R – Very difficult to engage, hard to reach on phone, don’t attend meetings often
A – Engage sometimes, not consistently
G – Engage regularly, support school life consistently,

SAFs book and ongoing data percentages for parental engagement, reading at home and attendance at TLCs. Parent feedback on adult courses (qualitative) and Parent Communication working group feedback (qualitative).

 

  1.  

All classes are achieving attendance at 96.1% in line with national averages

Range of incentives and drives led by Attendance officer.

Identified families are given direct support, engaging external agencies for additional help where appropriate (EHAF)

 

 

School Improvement Target 5: Improved Attendance (target: 96.1% minimum) and reduced Persistent Absence (target: below 16%)

Progress seen in all classes toward target of 96.1%

Persistent absence is tracked and is seen to reduce in Autumn Census data (below 16%)

Families with ongoing persistent attendance receive support in attendance meetings with Attendance officer

Attendance % tracking, Data analysis of pupil outcomes shows positive progress impact

 

         
 

 

  1. Planned expenditure

Academic year

2017-18

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

  1. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Children’s writing skill improve, leading to higher progress scores and raised attainment, including HA pupils.

Introduction of Rainbow Grammar

Interventions for pupils needing writing boosters

Use of Intervention groups to boost writing, including SPAG skills

Pupils attainment and progress in writing is an area of focus in internal data tracking.

Need to increase percentage HA reaching Greater depth

Need to maintain interventions in school to maintain progress gains due to high proportion not reading regularly at home. Need to encourage parents to read at home.

Monitoring of impact data, pupil interviews, writing outcomes at end of each term in pupil progress meetings/end of year data.

 

English lead training - £300

 

English resources (reading books) - £1000

 

JC (English Lead)

 

Children’s reading skills improve, leading to higher attainment scores and more pupils reading at home (Parental engagement focus)

Switch on reading

Reading buddies fortnightly

Vulnerable read interventions

Reading rewards –e g movie night, camps, picnics etc.

Attendance/Family Liason officer works with identified families on reading regularly at home.

 

 

Children’s attainment was below national in 2017 end of KS2 outcomes and progress was lower than 2016. This is a sig school improvement priority

Reading for enjoyment whole school target – reduce number of pupils needing vulnerable reads at home due to parents not listening to pupils read

Need to increase percentage HA reaching Greater depth

Monitoring of impact data, pupil interviews, reading outcomes at end of each term in pupil progress meetings/end of year data.

 

63 pupils having 10 mins daily read for the year - total - £25,429

Switch On - £5235 and training £150 (AC/SP)

 

Attendance /Family liason officer time £4000

JC (English Lead)

 

Children’s maths skills improve, leading to higher attainment and progress scores.

Maths instant, effective feedback (EEF Sutton Trust research)

Purchase resources to support Concrete, pictorial, abstract in White Rose Curriculum

Children’s attainment was below national in 2017 end of KS2 outcomes and progress needs to accelerate

 

Monitoring of impact data, pupil interviews, maths outcomes at end of each term in pupil progress meetings/end of year data.

 

TA time in/ after maths lessons to give instant, effective feedback – TA CPD costs, time and resources £7262 (30 mins daily per class)

 

 

JP (Maths Lead)

 

Communication and language

Language Lead

Language skills are targeted with identified pupils across KS1 and then disseminated in to KS2 as part of staff CPD.

ELKLAN impact in KS1 and rolling out to ensure gaps related to Communication and language are closed in KS2.

Need in EYFS data has been a focus for improvement in CL

Writing needs to improve – oral rehearsal with improved language skills will support this.

Pupils confidence and ability to engage is reduced for some identified pupils

 

Monitoring of impact on language skills with WELLCOM tool and tracking impact on writing from improved ability with language to orally rehearse before writing. ELKLAN intervention for language. Training costs.

 

TA time to deliver ELKLAN - cost included in TA hours below

PN/LS (Language Leads/ ELKLAN Lead)

 

TAs

 

SEND pupils

Targeted interventions, closely monitoring targets on provision maps to ensure progress toward targets.

Emotional coaching

Use of assessments (PM Benchmark, Salford, PUMA, Testbase, PIVATS) to closely track progress impact. SEN pupil tracker developed by SENCO (small steps progress)

SEND pupils show lower progress and attainment in data from assessment tracking in R, W, M.

Tracking needs in otrack and other formative/summative assessment.

 

 

Interventions/ Targeted support

- cost included in TA hours below

 

AG (SENCO)

 

 

TAs

 

 

 

Total budgeted cost

£43,376

  1. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Pupils are ready to learn and in school for attendance target

Breakfast club

Attendance officer – working with families directly

Attendance rewards and incentives for children and families

 

Some families need support with getting to school on time

Vulnerable pupils can have a good breakfast and parents are supported in getting to work

Opportunities for support staff to carry out interventions, reading 1:1 etc

Support for families and accountability to ensure attendance is supported to improve

Attendance/family liason officer engage other external agencies to extend support available.

Monitoring numbers and pupils on register.

Track data for pupils on register

Track number of reads in breakfast club on the register (who has read to an adult/ done maths games etc)

Pupil interviews

Tracking attendance data

£2361 – breakfast club staffing

Attendance/Family Liason officer salary £4000

 

ST/DH (Breakfast Club staff)

 

JW (Attendance and Family Liason Lead)

 

Pupils are able to access enrichment activities which build confidence

Lunchtimes and after school club

Exercise to boost serotonin for more confidence and feeling positive

Team activities

Enrichment

Physical skills

Art and creative opportunities and support with home learning.

Monitoring numbers and pupils on register.

Track data for pupils on register

Pupil interviews/ Questionnaire

£4723– after school club staffing

Plus other clubs

School trip support - £1500

Year 6 residential - £130 per pupil x 8 pupils – total £1040

Pupil mentoring by KL - £7085

AS/KL (After School Club Staff

 

AC (Curriculum Lead)

 

AG (SENCO)/KL (Learning Mentor)

 

Total budgeted cost

£20,709

  1. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Children become more resilient learners with more confidence and better attitudes to learning

TA time for 1:1 or small group Take 5 breathing additional intervention

CASY counselling or nurture groups

Learning mentor time

Peer Mentoring

Emotions Coaching

TLCs

Primary Mental Health Ambassador (PMHA) training

Some pupils produce less than expected in lessons and struggle with self-belief and confidence when asked about their work. Many of these pupils have support as vulnerable children relating to home circumstances.

We have a high number of pupils tracked through School and Family Support (SAFS) meetings.

Peer mentoring promotes nurture and working together (SWAN Values)

Staff have consistent approach to reinforce positive communication

Communication with parents and involvement in child target setting/ awareness of educational progress/attainment

2 x Primary Mental Health Ambassador training

Resilience scales for Take 5 breathing termly

SAFs monitoring monthly

Safeguard tracking online

CASY impact reports

Pupil interviews

Parent Questionnaire

PMHA audit and action plan monitored

Monitor impact on pupils through SAFs, Boxhall, Pupil progress meetings, Achievement team meetings (ATM)

 

CASY Counselling subscription £2850

 

 

JW (Attendance/Family Liason Lead)

AG (SENCO)

 

KL/LF (Primary Mental Health Ambassadors – PMHAs/ Learning Mentor)

 

JS/JR/AS (Take 5 Breathing Champions)

 

All Pupil Premium children to meet expected target academically.

TA support in class and enrichment activities/resources to support this outcome.

Ensuring that the gap between pupil premium and non-pupil premium closes to meet ARE.

TA costing in the morning (1 hour per TA) £12,265

 

 

Total budgeted cost

£15,115

 

 

  1. Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year

 

  1. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Additional detail

In this section you can annex or refer to additional information which you have used to inform the statement above.

Our full strategy document can be found online at: www.aschool.sch.uk

 

Top